Renaissance 2.0: Digitising History

I’ve just been reading Timothy J Riess’s book, Knowledge, Discovery and Imagination in Early Modern Europe: the Rise of Aesthetic Rationalism. This is an interesting book, suggesting that one of the reasons for the big changes that took place in the early modern period was a shift in focus at universities away from studying ‘Liberal Arts’ (grammar, logic, and rhetoric) known at the time as the Trivium, to the subjects that normally only Masters, or Quadrivium, students would study — arithmetic, geometry, music, and astronomy. He notes that a new skill began to be applied to all of these…